Mary Shelley published Frankenstein in 1818, anonymously. A sign of her times, and just one of many issues that make this cautionary tale so very timeless. I met the director of the Sacramento Public Library system, Rivkah Sass, over a year ago, with an immediate recognition of a kindred spirit. I’ve wanted to make a graphic novel for years, so I’m thrilled to participate in this project. Stay tuned to for event announcements from the Library.

This new interpretation features graphics that tell the story, along with edited content, just to move the story forward. In my head, as I’ve read the 1818 edition over and over, I try to bring my vision of what Mary describes to the story. Click here to see in process sketches.

Walton’s ship, the start of the story, presented as a series of flashbacks, in the voice of Walton, Frankenstein, and the monster.

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Young, arrogant Frankenstein sets out as a medical student, to solve the mysteries of death and life.

The monster comes alive. A little unfinished and more than unpredictable.

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In fact, the monster is pretty pissed off, especially when Frankenstein rejects him.

Rejected by his maker and all who see him, the monster seeks revenge.

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